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Information for Parents about Mouthguards

Information for Parents about Mouthguards

If you have kids involved in athletics, you need to know about mouthguards. Even non-contact sports, like skating or dance increase the risk of suffering harm to teeth.  Mouthguards can protect your child’s mouth and teeth. Here is a bit more information regarding this standard piece of protective equipment. Protection Mouthguards or mouth protectors provide a buffer that can cushion blows or trauma to the face. This can help reduce the chance of oral and facial injuries, including damaging the teeth. A mouthguard usually covers the upper teeth, providing protection for the lips, jaw, and tongue as well. What if my child wears a retainer? Remind your child to remove any orthodontic equipment, like retainers, before participating in any type of contact sport or activity. Reinforce a habit of removing the retainer and putting on the mouthguard any time that they engage or take part in sports.   Types of Mouthguards There are basically three different types of mouthguards available for your child, from the dentist-made, custom-fitted type to a basic, over-the-counter that is very affordable. The latter is called ‘boil and bite’ as you soften them in boiling water to help them adapt and form to the shape of your child’s mouth. In between the two price points are stock mouthguards, which are inexpensive and ready to wear. The best type of mouthguard for your child depends on a lot of variables but understand that a basic or stock guard will help to protect them if having a custom guard is not viable at this time. Want to learn more about protecting your child? Talk to Dr. Spieler, Blad...

How to Deal With a Cracked Tooth

Unlike a chipped tooth or a knocked-out tooth, a cracked tooth can often go unnoticed, especially if the tooth fracture is a very subtle one, like a hairline fracture. Sometimes they are so small they are difficult to see in an x-ray. A damaged tooth can lead to very serious consequences.  Signs of a Cracked Tooth Your dental team in Bala Cynwyd, PA recommends that you have your teeth checked if you suddenly start feeling localized pain whenever you bite into something. This is a common symptom of a damaged or cracked tooth. When your teeth are exposed to extreme hot or cold temperatures, you may also experience pain.  What makes a tooth crack? You can sometimes crack a tooth just by biting into a hard object like candy, or by chewing on something hard like nuts. If you frequently grind your teeth, that can make them more vulnerable to fractures as well. Then too, anyone who has been involved in an accident can easily crack a tooth simply by the trauma associated with the force and impact of a hard object. People involved with contact sports often sustain tooth fractures that need to be dealt with. What should you do? If you suspect you may have a tooth fracture, you should schedule an appointment at Oasis Dental as soon as possible. There, Dr. Spieler will find which tooth has been affected, and how severe the fracture is. Then, one of our dentists will repair your tooth. Depending on the nature of the crack, the dentist can treat a cracked tooth using bonding, performing a root canal, or perhaps...
Possible Link Between Obesity and Oral Health

Possible Link Between Obesity and Oral Health

Is there a link between poor oral health and obesity? According to a recent study, there could be. Obesity is becoming a hot topic on a global level. Many are beginning to see a correlation between individuals who have a BMI of over 30 and signs of gum disease. Some things make the study’s findings difficult such as participant’s gender, age, genetics, and smoking history. Still, there may be a correlation between the two. Results Indicate Bacteria Connection In this study, scientists took saliva samples from a group of women. Participants had a BMI of between 27 and 32. Of all of these samples, 98.4 percent contained the bacteria Selenomonas noxia. The formation of this bacteria is connected to a high glycemic diet, which contributes to both periodontal disease and obesity. The bacteria forms with the consumption of foods most often associated with those who are obese or overweight. Lifestyle and dietary changes can be effective for eradicating both oral bacteria and weight problems. This would mean avoiding foods that change to simple sugars in the mouth, refined carbohydrates, and foods that are already sugars. How Your Dentist Can Help While more research does need to be completed about this possible connection, it would seem that your dentist could very well begin asking you about your eating habits during your next dental appointment in Bala Cynwyd, PA. If you find yourself struggling with your oral health and your weight, Dr. Spieler of Oasis Dental may be able to give you advice about what foods to avoid if you want to improve your dental health. There is no guarantee that...
What is Gingivitis?

What is Gingivitis?

You may have heard the term but didn’t know what it was. The term Gingivitis can be frightening if you are unaware of what it is. Simply put, it is the inflammation of the gums. In itself, it is not serious, but it can lead to dental problems if it’s not treated properly. What causes gingivitis? Gingivitis is generally caused by a buildup of plaque in and around the teeth. But there are also other causes. The buildup can occur due to the presence of certain types of bacteria, an allergic reaction, malnutrition, or even genetic factors. It can also sometimes occur for apparently no reason at all. While it is considered to be a non-destructive dental condition, it is important that it is diagnosed and treated early by a dental professional. Importance of Early Treatment  An early diagnosis means dentists can treat it before it progresses to a more serious condition. Although gingivitis is not serious in most cases, when left untreated it can lead to periodontitis or gum disease. This can eventually lead to tooth loss. Symptoms of Gingivitis How do you know if you have gingivitis? The actual condition requires a diagnosis from a dental professional. Initially, you may notice swollen gums. Once it becomes more severe it can cause symptoms such as bright red gums, bad breath, bleeding during brushing or flossing, and receding gums. If you have noticed any of these signs or symptoms, it’s important to discuss it with a dental professional. Treatment The good news is that many cases of gingivitis can be reversed with proper treatment. If you suspect that you...
Hydration and Oral Health

Hydration and Oral Health

Water, glorious water, it’s truly the miracle liquid. Most of us understand that water is good for the body, but did you know water is good for your teeth too? Believe it or not, water offers some powerful benefits for your dental health. The clear liquid has the ability to prevent excessive build-up of bacteria and deliver essential nutrients to your teeth as well. Dr. Spieler of Oasis Dental understands that many patients are unaware of all the benefits hydration has on their oral health. Water does all that? The Bala Cynwyd, PA dental team takes pride in educating patients on the many ways that water positively impacts holistic health. This miracle fluid is filled with many natural goodies like fluoride, minerals, calcium, and phosphate. These powerful nutrients help fortify the teeth. In addition, it has many helpful functions. Water effectively: Helps build and maintain strong teeth because it’s nutrient rich Helps wash away food particles and prevent excessive sugar build-up Prevents cavities that can develop from the excessive consumption of sugary drinks because it’s a sugar-free option Helps prevent tooth decay by diluting the saliva Helps prevent dry mouth Water and Holistic Health Your body is sixty percent water. It’s a necessity for many bodily functions as well as beneficial to your overall health. Water is a calorie-free option that helps to lose weight, get rid of waste, and keep muscles strong and supple. However, few of us realize how powerful water can be for our teeth as well. With every sip, our teeth are being washed and strengthened. Drinking water has many holistic and collective advantages that...
How Important is Brushing the Tongue?

How Important is Brushing the Tongue?

Should I Be Brushing My Tongue Too? You most likely understand how important brushing your teeth is to your overall oral health. It can help prevent cavities and decay. But if no one told you yet, it is just as important that you start brushing the tongue too. It’s easy and you can do it when you brush your teeth. Here’s what you need to know about brushing your tongue. What’s that on my tongue? In many ways, brushing your tongue is just as important as brushing your teeth. Your tongue is the perfect breeding ground for bacteria, and the biofilm of bacteria that forms on your tongue can cause problems ranging from bad breath to periodontal disease. No amount of rinsing or mouthwash will completely remove this bacteria so you will need to brush your tongue if you want to remove it. Getting Rid of Bad Breath Of course, not brushing your tongue is only one possible cause of bad breath. Tooth decay, periodontal disease, and health conditions such as diabetes and gastrointestinal disorders can cause just as many problems for some people. When you don’t brush or clean your tongue, the film that develops can cause you to have on-going halitosis. That’s not only bad for your dental health, but also for those you hang out with. It’s easy to get rid of it though by simply brushing your tongue with your toothbrush after you finish caring for your teeth.  More Questions? Contact Dr. Spieler at Oasis Dental if you have any concerns or questions about your oral health or brushing your tongue. Oasis Dental is located...
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