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Possible Link Between Obesity and Oral Health

Possible Link Between Obesity and Oral Health

.Is there a link between poor oral health and obesity? According to a recent study, there could be. Obesity is becoming a hot topic on a global level. Many are beginning to see a correlation between individuals who have a BMI of over 30 and signs of gum disease. Some things make the study’s findings difficult such as participant’s gender, age, genetics, and smoking history. Still, there may be a correlation between the two. Results Indicate Bacteria Connection In this study, scientists took saliva samples from a group of women. Participants had a BMI of between 27 and 32. Of all of these samples, 98.4 percent contained the bacteria Selenomonas noxia. The formation of this bacteria is connected to a high glycemic diet, which contributes to both periodontal disease and obesity. The bacteria forms with the consumption of foods most often associated with those who are obese or overweight. Lifestyle and dietary changes can be effective for eradicating both oral bacteria and weight problems. This would mean avoiding foods that change to simple sugars in the mouth, refined carbohydrates, and foods that are already sugars. How Your Dentist Can Help While more research does need to be completed about this possible connection, it would seem that your dentist could very well begin asking you about your eating habits during your next dental appointment in Bala Cynwyd, PA. If you find yourself struggling with your oral health and your weight, Dr. Spieler of Oasis Dental may be able to give you advice about what foods to avoid if you want to improve your dental health. There is no guarantee that...
What is Gingivitis?

What is Gingivitis?

You may have heard the term but didn’t know what it was. The term Gingivitis can be frightening if you are unaware of what it is. Simply put, it is the inflammation of the gums. In itself, it is not serious, but it can lead to dental problems if it’s not treated properly. What causes gingivitis? Gingivitis is generally caused by a buildup of plaque in and around the teeth. But there are also other causes. The buildup can occur due to the presence of certain types of bacteria, an allergic reaction, malnutrition, or even genetic factors. It can also sometimes occur for apparently no reason at all. While it is considered to be a non-destructive dental condition, it is important that it is diagnosed and treated early by a dental professional. Importance of Early Treatment  An early diagnosis means dentists can treat it before it progresses to a more serious condition. Although gingivitis is not serious in most cases, when left untreated it can lead to periodontitis or gum disease. This can eventually lead to tooth loss. Symptoms of Gingivitis How do you know if you have gingivitis? The actual condition requires a diagnosis from a dental professional. Initially, you may notice swollen gums. Once it becomes more severe it can cause symptoms such as bright red gums, bad breath, bleeding during brushing or flossing, and receding gums. If you have noticed any of these signs or symptoms, it’s important to discuss it with a dental professional. Treatment The good news is that many cases of gingivitis can be reversed with proper treatment. If you suspect that you...
Hydration and Oral Health

Hydration and Oral Health

Water, glorious water, it’s truly the miracle liquid. Most of us understand that water is good for the body, but did you know water is good for your teeth too? Believe it or not, water offers some powerful benefits for your dental health. The clear liquid has the ability to prevent excessive build-up of bacteria and deliver essential nutrients to your teeth as well. Dr. Spieler of Oasis Dental understands that many patients are unaware of all the benefits hydration has on their oral health. Water does all that? The Bala Cynwyd, PA dental team takes pride in educating patients on the many ways that water positively impacts holistic health. This miracle fluid is filled with many natural goodies like fluoride, minerals, calcium, and phosphate. These powerful nutrients help fortify the teeth. In addition, it has many helpful functions. Water effectively: Helps build and maintain strong teeth because it’s nutrient rich Helps wash away food particles and prevent excessive sugar build-up Prevents cavities that can develop from the excessive consumption of sugary drinks because it’s a sugar-free option Helps prevent tooth decay by diluting the saliva Helps prevent dry mouth Water and Holistic Health Your body is sixty percent water. It’s a necessity for many bodily functions as well as beneficial to your overall health. Water is a calorie-free option that helps to lose weight, get rid of waste, and keep muscles strong and supple. However, few of us realize how powerful water can be for our teeth as well. With every sip, our teeth are being washed and strengthened. Drinking water has many holistic and collective advantages that...
How Important is Brushing the Tongue?

How Important is Brushing the Tongue?

Should I Be Brushing My Tongue Too? You most likely understand how important brushing your teeth is to your overall oral health. It can help prevent cavities and decay. But if no one told you yet, it is just as important that you start brushing the tongue too. It’s easy and you can do it when you brush your teeth. Here’s what you need to know about brushing your tongue. What’s that on my tongue? In many ways, brushing your tongue is just as important as brushing your teeth. Your tongue is the perfect breeding ground for bacteria, and the biofilm of bacteria that forms on your tongue can cause problems ranging from bad breath to periodontal disease. No amount of rinsing or mouthwash will completely remove this bacteria so you will need to brush your tongue if you want to remove it. Getting Rid of Bad Breath Of course, not brushing your tongue is only one possible cause of bad breath. Tooth decay, periodontal disease, and health conditions such as diabetes and gastrointestinal disorders can cause just as many problems for some people. When you don’t brush or clean your tongue, the film that develops can cause you to have on-going halitosis. That’s not only bad for your dental health, but also for those you hang out with. It’s easy to get rid of it though by simply brushing your tongue with your toothbrush after you finish caring for your teeth.  More Questions? Contact Dr. Spieler at Oasis Dental if you have any concerns or questions about your oral health or brushing your tongue. Oasis Dental is located...
When to Discuss a Sore Palate with Your Dentist

When to Discuss a Sore Palate with Your Dentist

Should I Worry about a Sore Palate? There are many reasons why the roof of your mouth might become swollen or painful. Most of them don’t raise any cause for alarm. Some of these include a scratch that you might get from eating crunchy food or a burn from eating or drinking something that is too hot. Canker sores and cold sores can also cause swelling in the roof of your mouth. All of these are uncomfortable and even painful, but they usually go away in less than a week.  When to Speak to Your Dentist Even though swelling in the roof of your mouth is usually a minor problem, there are a few times when you will need to speak to your dentist or your doctor about a sore palate. If an underlying condition causes the swelling, you should schedule an appointment with your dentist. Health conditions such as oral cancer, human papillomavirus, and viral hepatitis can cause swelling and pain in the roof of your mouth. It is advisable to speak to your dentist if you believe that you have any of these conditions. Let Oasis Dental Help! You should also make an appointment Oasis Dental in Bala Cynwyd, PA if your swelling has persisted for longer than a week or the roof of your mouth is particularly painful. Dr. Spieler will be glad to answer any questions that you may have and help determine how to best treat the pain or swelling. You’ll find relief and improved oral health once he has treated whatever may be the primary cause and source of the pain and...
Oral Thrush: Get In the Know About Oral Yeast

Oral Thrush: Get In the Know About Oral Yeast

When an excess growth of yeast occurs in your mouth or esophagus, oral thrush can develop, says Dr. Spieler of Oasis Dental. While it is natural for bacterial yeast to exist in your mouth, occasionally an overgrowth can occur. That’s what triggers oral thrush. This type of yeast is the same type of organism that causes vaginal yeast infections to develop. How to recognize oral thrush One of the most recognizable symptoms of oral thrush is the appearance of white lesions on the roof the mouth, and sometimes in the back of the mouth. These lesions most often look something like cottage cheese, although they can also sometimes be a reddish color. People who develop oral thrush will often experience difficulty swallowing, or a kind of woolly feeling in the mouth. People at risk for developing oral thrush In Bala Cynwyd, PA, as elsewhere in the U.S., the people who are most likely to develop oral thrush are immuno-suppressed patients, such as those who are being treated with chemotherapy, those who have HIV/AIDS, or those who have uncontrolled diabetes. When you have a suppressed immune system, it leaves you more vulnerable to infection, which allows thrush to develop in the mouth. Another group of at-risk people is those who take asthma medication or oral steroids. Either of those medications can interfere with the normal balance of yeast in the mouth. Rinsing the mouth out after inhalation can reduce the risk of developing oral thrush. For more information about oral infections and how to prevent them, or any other dental concerns you may have, be sure to talk to Dr....
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