Possible Link Between Obesity and Oral Health

Possible Link Between Obesity and Oral Health

Is there a link between poor oral health and obesity? According to a recent study, there could be. Obesity is becoming a hot topic on a global level. Many are beginning to see a correlation between individuals who have a BMI of over 30 and signs of gum disease. Some things make the study’s findings difficult such as participant’s gender, age, genetics, and smoking history. Still, there may be a correlation between the two. Results Indicate Bacteria Connection In this study, scientists took saliva samples from a group of women. Participants had a BMI of between 27 and 32. Of all of these samples, 98.4 percent contained the bacteria Selenomonas noxia. The formation of this bacteria is connected to a high glycemic diet, which contributes to both periodontal disease and obesity. The bacteria forms with the consumption of foods most often associated with those who are obese or overweight. Lifestyle and dietary changes can be effective for eradicating both oral bacteria and weight problems. This would mean avoiding foods that change to simple sugars in the mouth, refined carbohydrates, and foods that are already sugars. How Your Dentist Can Help While more research does need to be completed about this possible connection, it would seem that your dentist could very well begin asking you about your eating habits during your next dental appointment in Bala Cynwyd, PA. If you find yourself struggling with your oral health and your weight, Dr. Spieler of Oasis Dental may be able to give you advice about what foods to avoid if you want to improve your dental health. There is no guarantee that...
Pneumonia and Your Dental Visits

Pneumonia and Your Dental Visits

It’s well-known that pneumonia is a winter worry for lots of people. But it turns out that washing your hands isn’t the only way to avoid developing pneumonia. The recommendation to visit your Bala Cynwyd, PA dentist twice a year is about more than keeping your smile healthy and beautiful. A recent study suggests that regular dental check-ups can lower your risk of pneumonia. Pneumonia is a serious illness that affects nearly a million Americans every year. Though there are risk factors, such as age and conditions like lung disease, research has found that people who do not go to regular six-month check-ups are at higher risk for developing pneumonia compared to people who visit the dentist regularly. The study shows that oral health has a strong connection to overall physical health. By taking good care of your mouth (and teeth), you’ll be able to take better care of your whole body. To help keep your smile healthy (and reduce your risk of pneumonia), call Oasis Dental to make an appointment with Dr. Spieler...
Periodontal Disease and Your Overall Health

Periodontal Disease and Your Overall Health

Most of us would agree that taking good care of our teeth and gums is a small price to pay for a healthy white smile. Neglecting our oral health can affect us even when the effects aren’t visible.  Dr. Spieler understands the impact that practicing good oral health can have on your teeth and gums as well as the rest of your body. When Our Teeth and Gums Are Neglected… Our teeth and gums, when lacking care, can begin to get cavities and other health disorders like periodontal disease. The Bala Cynwyd, PA dental team knows of a recent study showing how pathogenic bacteria present in oral diseases like periodontal disease has the ability to travel to other parts of the body and potentially facilitate the development of other diseases. As a result, the benefits of consistently caring for your teeth and gums are clear. Practicing good oral hygiene can be helpful in preventing periodontal disease, which not only harms your oral health but can increase your likelihood of other diseases of the body, including cardiovascular disease and even cancer. Good oral health includes the practice of regularly visiting your dentist as well. Prevention and early diagnosis are keys to keeping oral health issues at bay as well as the potential for developing other diseases of the body, so make sure to come to your Oasis Dental team twice a year for a cleanup on top of your daily oral...
Calcium and Vitamin D: Your Teeth Need Vitamins Too!

Calcium and Vitamin D: Your Teeth Need Vitamins Too!

Vitamin D and calcium are supplements taken to prevent bone loss. A new study from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research suggests that taking calcium and vitamin D can also prevent tooth loss in older adults. Participants in the study took 500 mg of calcium plus 700 units of vitamin D each day, with those that weren’t in the placebo group showing around 40% less likeliness of losing teeth. But on top of this recommended amount, seniors who want to hang on to their pearly whites should get regular dental care at Oasis Dental and perform regular brushing and flossing to ensure that they keep their original set of teeth. Increased Age Increases Risk of Tooth Loss Seniors need to be aware that as they age, their teeth become more prone to cavities because the root surface becomes more exposed. Many of the most common prescription drugs dry the mouth, which prevents the saliva from washing away the bacteria in the mouth. Limited mobility and joint pain make it more difficult to brush and floss. Ask Dr. Spieler about solutions to help you take care of your teeth. Taking a Supplement When choosing a calcium supplement, choose calcium citrate instead of calcium carbonate as it is easier to absorb. Vitamin D added to the supplement can also increase absorption. Look for a high-quality supplement with the USP symbol. Make sure to make an appointment with your Bala Cynwyd, PA dentist to take care of gum disease and other tooth...
Opioid Abuse: How We Can Help

Opioid Abuse: How We Can Help

The ADA commits to multi-disciplinary efforts toward ending opioid abuse, as do loving, caring dental businesses like Oasis Dental. Did you know that prescription opioids, heroin and fentanyl took more than 42,000 lives back in 2016 — more than in other years past? 40% of those deaths involved prescription pain relievers, according to the CDC, but this doesn’t quite account for the nearly two million Americans reported as having abused these products. The ADA has recently begun to include advanced education and training for dentists so that we can assist in fighting the opioid crisis while still maintaining our obligation to managing dental pain. There are numerous complexities surrounding modern pain management within dentistry, even including the very nature of drug addiction, methods for screening patients to glimpse possible substance use disorders, and proven techniques to motivate those at risk who desire the right treatment. In 2016, the ADA last updated its previous statement on opioids use in treating dental pain. For one thing, the statement urged dental professionals to more closely follow the CDC’s “opioid-prescribing guidelines for chronic pain” while using their own state’s prescription-drug monitoring programs, completing continuing education, and using non-narcotics as the primary therapy for this acute dental pain. The ADA also raised greater awareness regarding opioid analgesic abuse through partnering with several outside organizations like the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, the DEA, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration, and the U.S. Surgeon General as well. And many now pressure Congress to enact funding for a 2016 legislation to authorize multiple activities preventing opioid misuse. Whether you live in beautiful Bala Cynwyd, PA...
Bad Breath: There’s A Reason Behind It

Bad Breath: There’s A Reason Behind It

It’s a situation most of us can relate to: you really enjoy the company of a loved one and you want to be close to them, but their bad breath has got you keeping your distance. Halitosis, commonly referred to as bad breath, could also be a sign of a serious oral health concern, according to Dr. Spieler at Oasis Dental in Bala Cynwyd, PA. Mouth Infection Mouth sores, gum disease, and tooth decay could be the reason you have halitosis. Bad breath is an even more serious sign if it is occurring after an oral surgery like tooth removal, because you may have surgical wounds not healing correctly. Any prolonged bad breath or sudden turn for the worse may be the sign of serious tooth decay, an impacted tooth, or even gastrointestinal disorders. Brushing and Flossing Correctly An inconsistent oral hygiene routine means that bacteria will grow and feed on remaining food particles, causing halitosis. The American Dental Association recommends brushing twice daily, and placing your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums while gently moving it back and forth. Flossing should also be done softly but intensively. If you are notice that you have prolonged bad breath, schedule your next cleaning and examination with Dr. Spieler so he and his Bala Cynwyd team can ensure that your smile and your breath are at their...
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